Mystery Books

Mystery Movies

  • Flightplan (Widescreen Edition)

    Academy Award(R) winner Jodie Foster (Best Actress, THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS, 1991) gives an outstanding performance in the heart-

  • Devil's Advocate

    Hotshot attorney accepts tempting offer from an elite New York law firm only to find himself fighting for his soul.Genre:

  • Twin Peaks: The Complete Series (The Definitive Gold Box Edition)

    The Definitive Gold Box Edition of the series that became one of television's most acclaimed events finally arrives - with all 29

  • Gone Girl

    GONE GIRL -- directed by David Fincher and based upon the global bestseller by Gillian Flynn -- unearths the secrets at the heart

  • Jacob's Ladder

    A Vietnam vet, back at home in New York City, finds himself losing his grip on reality, in a horrifying way; only his friend can h

  • More...

Mystery Authors

Craig Rice biography

Rice

 

 

Craig Rice

Georgiana Ann Craig

(1957 - 1908)

Craig Rice (pseudonym of Georgiana Ann Craig; 1908–1957) was an American author of mystery novels and short stories, sometimes described as "the Dorothy Parker of detective fiction." She was the first mystery writer to appear on the cover of Time Magazine, on January 28, 1946.

Craig Rice "apparently spent her early life working in (Chicago) on radio and in public relations. For a number of years she tried unsuccessfully to write novels, poetry and music, but it was not until her first story of John J. Malone, which she published under her birth surname and adopted surname [Craig Rice], that she enjoyed some hard-won success."[1]

Gritty but humorous, Rice's stories uniquely combine the hardboiled detective tradition with no-holds-barred, screwball comedy. Most of her output features a memorable trio of protagonists: Jake Justus, a handsome but none too bright press agent with his heart in the right place; Helene Brand, a rich heiress and hard-drinking party animal par excellence (to become Mrs. Justus in the later novels); and John Joseph Malone, a hard-drinking, small-time lawyer (though both his cryptic conversation and sartorial habits are more reminiscent of such official or private gumshoes as Lieutenant Columbo). Against the odds and often apparently more by luck than skill, these three manage to solve crimes whose details are often burlesque and surreal, sometimes to the point of grand guignol, and all involving the perpetually exasperated Captain Daniel Von Flanagan of the Homicide Squad. A few stories feature the team of Bingo Riggs and Handsome Kusak, small-time grifters who become involved in criminal situations and have to dig themselves free by solving the mystery.

Craig Rice also ghostwrote for a number of celebrities, including Gypsy Rose Lee and George Sanders.[2] "While the collaboration with Gypsy is often reported, this claim cannot be independently verified."[3] Her association with Sanders came about as a result of her work on the screenplays of two of The Falcon movies, The Falcon's Brother (1942, Sanders's final outing as The Falcon) and The Falcon in Danger (1943, when Sanders's brother Tom Conway had taken over the role). She collaborated with fellow mystery writer Stuart Palmer on screenplays and short stories and with Ed McBain on a novel for which she furnished the principal characters, Bingo Riggs and Handsome Kusak. (The "collaboration" with McBain is a "posthumous collaboration in which McBain completed an unfinished book begun by Rice. In a foreword to at least one edition of the book, McBain wrote that the book was essentially half-finished in first draft, but there were no notes as tohow she had intended to continue it, so that he had to solve the mystery himself before completing the MS.)

She had three children, two daughters and a son. "Craig Rice kept very few personal records. She was conventionally wed four times with other affairs."[3] One of her husbands was beat poet Lawrence Lipton. A reader of her 1944 novel Home Sweet Homicide might be excused for believing that it was based on her experiences with her own children; the children solve a mystery while their mother, oblivious to their antics and everything else around her, tries to finish writing a mystery novel. The novel is told from the children's point of view.

Emulating the wild lifestyle of her characters, Rice developed chronic alcoholism and made several suicide attempts. She also suffered from deteriorating health, including deafness in one ear and blindness in one eye with incipient glaucoma in the other. She died of apparently natural causes shortly before her fiftieth birthday.

Information source: wikipedia
<