Mystery Books

Mystery Movies

  • 12 Monkeys (Special Edition)

    In this science fiction masterpiece, Cole (Bruce Willis) is sent back in time to save the human race from a deadly virus that has

  • The Butterfly Effect (Infinifilm Edition)

    Butterfly Effect, The (DVD)Ashton Kutcher stars as a man who has lost track of time. From an early age, crucial

  • Triangle

    When Jess sets sail on her friend Greg's (Michael Dorman, "The Secret Life Of Us") yacht with a group of friends, she cannot shake

  • Memento

    Point blank in the head a man shoots another. In flashbacks, each one earlier in time than what we've just seen, the two men's pas

  • Exam

    Like Saw for corporate go-getters, in EXAM eight young people vying for a sought-after job are locked together in a room and given

  • More...

Mystery Authors

Sidney Sheldon biography

 

 

Sidney Sheldon

(1917 - 2007)

Sidney Sheldon (February 11, 1917 January 30, 2007) was an Academy Award-winning American writer. His TV works spanned a 20-year period during which he created The Patty Duke Show (196366), I Dream of Jeannie (196570) and Hart to Hart (197984), but it was not until after he turned 50 and began writing best-selling novels such as Master of the Game (1982), The Other Side of Midnight (1973) and Rage of Angels (1980) that he became most famous.

In 1969, Sheldon wrote his first novel, The Naked Face, which earned him a nomination for the Edgar Allan Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America in the category of Best First Novel. His next novel, The Other Side of Midnight, climbed to #1 on The New York Times Best Seller list as did several ensuing novels, a number of which were also made into motion pictures or TV miniseries. His novels often featured determined women who persevere in a tough world run by hostile men.[1] The novels contained a lot of suspense and devices to keep the reader turning the page:[1] I try to write my books so the reader can't put them down," he explained in a 1982 interview. "I try to construct them so when the reader gets to the end of a chapter, he or she has to read just one more chapter. It's the technique of the old Saturday afternoon serial: leave the guy hanging on the edge of the cliff at the end of the chapter. Most of his readers were women.[1] Asked why this was the case he said: "I like to write about women who are talented and capable, but most important, retain their femininity. Women have tremendous power their femininity, because men can't do without it."[1] Books were Sheldon's favorite medium. "I love writing books," he commented. "Movies are a collaborative medium, and everyone is second-guessing you. When you do a novel you're on your own. It's a freedom that doesn't exist in any other medium."[

Information source: wikipedia